Sunday Thoughts

Mass shootings are horrible. No doubt. No argument. They are clearly the work of the most disturbed among us.

They do not tell the whole story. Thus, we should not frame this entire discussion about gun violence on mass shootings. How could we ever predict such incomprehensible tragedy?

But, if we choose to; if we are brave enough; we can look at the aspects of gun violence that we can impact.

Every day in the US, the death toll is the equivalent of 3 “Auroras” — roughly 34 people murdered by guns.

Road rage, domestic violence, shooting the neighbor in the course of an argument…Can we explore this intersection? Violence and impulse?

We need to consider how this nation treats our mentally ill. Absolutely. But every country has citizens who are mentally ill; some have good systems for addressing mental health, some not. None of them have the murder rate we do. None have the frequency of mass killings we do.

We need to address our ready access to firearms. NO NOT A BAN. No reasonable person is suggesting a ban so just stop it.
Gun owners (me among them) need to step up and ensure our weapons are appropriately secured. Sure, yours is and so is mine but too many of them are not.
Very few murders are the result of criminal masterminds. There is no illegal gun factory cranking out illegal firearms. Almost exclusively, every firearm starts out legitimate. They find their way into the illegal market when they are lost, stolen or simply acquired through straw purchase. We can agree to fix this can we not?
Background checks. Mandatory safety training. Micro-etched ammunition. How does any of that truly infringe on the right to bear arms?
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3 thoughts on “Sunday Thoughts

  1. Is it careless ownership when a son uses one of his mother’s weapons to murder her and then break into a locked school to kill children and others before taking his own life? We can say, “Yes, it is carelessness,” but, unfortunately, there is something much more going on here. How about liability insurance for every knife, etc., used in a crime? In saying these things, I am not attacking any idea. Everything should be looked at. The difficulty is knowing the right questions and the right actions to take. Obviously, something has to be done keep a lunatic with murder on his mind and weapons in his possession from being able to break into a school with locked doors by smashing a window in to gain entry. Jennifer, thank you for your thoughts.

  2. You have an ability that many just don’t. You have, yet again, explained in a forward thinking manner, the reason for legislation. I am not a gun owner, but have been raised in a home where Respect towards guns wasn’t expected, it was demanded.
    My parents, my mom now in heaven, are life time members of the NRA, and made me one upon my birth. Like many things, I have my own thoughts. I was in the Army. The weapon I fired in the Army is not necessary for the public and shouldn’t be available. Why would anyone need a magazine clip that holds more than 10 bullets? They don’t. Why would anyone be hesitant to background checks? I totally support it and pray that private sellers will be forced to perform a background check.
    We know criminals don’t follow the law or they wouldn’t be criminals. We don’t have to assist them in getting guns. During a burglary in my home in 2008, the burglars tried to break into and drag out a 2000 pound (when empty) gun safe, now full, with a furniture dolly. Thankfully, they failed. It stopped my dad from shooting for several months as we had to fix the locking mechanism, but guns weren’t stolen and on the streets.
    I think all gun owners should have a safe for their guns. It would stop the kids from “accidentally” shooting themselves and others, and prevent thefts which is where many of the criminals guns come from.
    I haven’t been the victim of a shooting, so I can’t possibly know, but I support you and this legislation 100%. You are a hero. Don’t even say you’re not. You have shared your story with millions and it HAS made a difference. Thank you for taking us through your journey and allowing us that inside look. Because of you, I’m not afraid of my chair and being in public. I no longer feel weak or second class. I am stronger because of your story. Thank you!

    Stef

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